Moss on a limestone boulder.

The slow art of moss growing

Growing moss is an art that demands patience and diligence I discovered during a recent talk at the Toronto Botanical Gardens given by Frank Kershaw, one of my favourite speakers and a gardening guru par excellence. But there are shortcuts. Frank let us in on some fascinating information and unexpected tips for creating a velvety green…

Butterflies on a stick

When I first saw this mesmerizing flower at Sissinghurst Castle Garden in the Weald of Kent (which is a fancy way of saying in a bit of South East England) I had no idea that the plant was actually a North American wildflower. All I could think of was that all those delicate white and…

Caladiums

Seeing red in a bed

If you love to stop people in their tracks, try stuffing a garden bed with flaming red Caladiums. They’ll only last until frost but if you plant them in late spring, what a show they’ll put on all summer. They’re really handy if you’ve got: • a shady spot–part to full shade • lots of…

Goutweed and hostas

A weed by any other name

Nowhere is the old adage about beauty being in the eye of the beholder more appropriate than when you’re staring at a great weed. The unfortunately named Goutweed is a weed for sure. But what a beauty. And handy, too–if you feel like living dangerously. Aegopodium podagraria aka Goutweed aka ground elder, bishop’s weed or snow-in-the-mountain…

Ant sculptures

Here comes summer 7 ways

The longest day of the year officially began at about ten to seven this morning. Realizing that this means tomorrow marks the inexorable decline of daylight hours into another long, slow winter, I figure celebrating heat and happiness is in order. After snooping in a lot of people’s gardens, I’m loving these  ways to get the…

Container planting for shade

Container idea: One colour wonders

In art class, a depiction of a bunch of stuff all in the same colour family is considered monochromatic. Think Picasso during his Blue Period. In gardening, this is usually considered boring. Unless you were Vita Sackville-West, whose White Garden (Ok, so there are green and silvery grey plants, too) at Sissinghurst Castle still brings droves…