Trout lilies with a tritium

Silly lilies: Beauty with humour

Easter lilies are in grocery stores everywhere right now. They’re wonderful plants–heralding the coming of spring, symbolizing new beginnings (for both Christians and Pagans) and are/were absolutely de rigueur as an OTT decor flourish, especially during the fabulousity that was the 90’s. But as much as I respect and admire the glamour of Lilium longiflorum,…

Sunset over Pacific Ocean

Nature, explained.

“The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness.” So said American “Father of National Parks” John Muir in 1938. He had a unique and powerful way of describing nature and this particuilar piece of advice comes across as practical, mystical, exciting and impossible–all at once. But inspiring nonetheless. Whenever I discover something…

Small signs of spring

Two ways to get this spring moving

Fellow denizens of the Northern Hemisphere–it’s time to celebrate. The spring equinox has finally arrived. Maybe you’ve already noticed more birds hanging about, all singing with marked enthusiasm. Maybe you saw some tiny green sprouts shyly poking up out of the ground where, just last week, there was only crusty snow or mud or, in…

In praise of garden bridges

Bridges are amazing things. They are the very manifestation of a proposition. What’s a bridge if not the offer to be on the other side? But they don’t have to span a physical thing like a river or a highway. According to Cambridge Dictionary, a bridge can be “something that makes it easier to make…

Red, a love story

I first laid eyes on Red when he was on his last legs. Stunted, hunched and neglected, Red was clearly in need of love and care. But I snatched him up, not because I felt a need to do the right thing but because I was desperate for a sketch model and he was the…

Looking but not seeing

I drew a maple leaf the other day. Just a doodle, really. I wanted to try out some newfangled coloured pencils. The pencil lines turn into watercolours if you trace over them with a wet brush. I got half way through my drawing when I realized something wasn’t quite right. I’d drawn the veins without…

Oh, gosh! Blue Cohosh?

A wonderfully mysterious plant at the base of a tree stump on our neighbour’s property caught my eye this spring (May, 2021). The stems and new leaves, looking like shredded rags, were a lovely deep purple with a velvety sheen. Amidst the leaves were tiny blue brown flowers, each accented with a mini golden star.…

Pink water lilies in a garden in Maine.

A lotus confusion involving water lilies

Hello, there. It’s been awhile, I know. What prompted me to dive back into blogging’s depthless waters was a long wait at the post office. On the wall was a poster displaying Canada Post’s recent issue of its annual flower stamps. The lush colours were as seductive to my snow-weary eyes as an oasis to a…

A staircase in a large woodland garden uses logs as treads

Upcycle stumps and logs for a rustic chic garden

Maybe it’s our depressingly dark, wet, cool June here in southwestern Ontario that’s inspired me to look at dead things with renewed interest. While the plants I’ve recently installed in the ground and in containers are already looking exhausted from repeated deluges, perpetually damp stumps and fallen logs are springing to life as generous hosts…

Video still of Tertill, a robotic weeder.

Do we need robot weeders?

Massachusetts-based Franklin Robotics, developers of the infamous Roomba Robot Vacuum [Editor’s note: In case you don’t know what a Roomba looks like, check out this video: Cat In A Shark Costume Chases A Duck While Riding A Roomba] is seeking financial aid on Kickstarter for their latest invention–a solar-powered weeding robot dubbed Tertill. The small,…